Sunday, December 17, 2006

Shiner 97 Bohemian Black Lager and Gouache Underpainting, Part 2

Most of the beers I've posted have been good. Time for a disappointment. Although it is not a stout or porter, we picked up Shiner 97 Bohemian Black Lager because of the word "black." Some very good dark beers are labeled simply as "black," not stout or porter. But this beer really is a lager, and has almost no dark beer qualities. It tastes just like a light beer, but with heavy undertones. Conclusion: although it might be a good lager (I don't really know), we won't be buying it again.

M: 4
N: 4

************************************
Gouache Underpainting, the Final Chapter

I admit to being a complete newbie when it comes to 1) painting 2) color and 3) portraits. So I really didn't know what I was doing. I chose some colors that I thought would make a good skin tone, and mixed them willy-nilly. I ended up with a color that would look good on a tropical parakeet... but I wasn't going to throw out all that paint. So forgive the ultra-tanned sheen that makes Grandpa look like he's a snorkel instructor in Tuvalu.

I attempted to paint over Left Grandpa. I mixed four values with this shade, but added some blue into the darks for a more interesting contrast. I mixed a few shades of suit and hair color as well. And I painted over.
I forgot to paint the glasses. Anyway, You can see that on the face, the underpainting didn't show through at all. I used opaque mixes for the face, and although the underpainting was a good guide, it didn't do much else. It was great to paint on something other than white, though. On the suit, I used a much more transparent mix, and the underpainting showed through.
Here are some of the techniques I used. You can see the results - not too great. Dry brush looks terrible. Add water and it gives nice texture. Scrubbing an area lifts like nobody's business.

So I learned how to make it work, but didn't much like the results. Lesson: if you make the second layer transparent enough for the underpainting to show through, it tends to lift. Therefore, my actual painting of grandpa will use a watery wash as the underpainting, so I am not painting on white. From this experiment, mostly I learned what not to do.

No comments: