Sunday, December 24, 2006

Stoudt's Fat Dog Imperial Oatmeal Stout and Gouache Portraits

Stoudt's Fat Dog Imperial Oatmeal Stout is this week's excellent beer selection. It is excellent because there is a fat dog on each label. Also because it is sweet and delicious. Its taste is reminiscent of the perfect oatmeal cookie. One sip and the flavor fills your whole mouth. Swallow and a slight tangy aftertaste fills you with nostalgia, making you long for another mouthful. I can see how it got its name; I could drink these all day and end up 1) drunk as a dog and 2) fat as the dog on the bottle.
Ratings:

M: 9.5
N: 8.5

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Gouache Portraits

The weeks-long activity that I wrapped up last Friday encompasses all my experience with gouache portraits. Here is what I have produced:
I'm fairly happy with it, in that naive-new-to-a-medium (gouache) and -genre (portrait) way, and will probably hate it for its blatant shortcomings once I grow into a good painter. Even now, having learned from the process, there are a few things I would change.

I finally got the likeness right and transferred it to Crescent illo board. It was mounted on thin backing, and as soon as I laid down the toning wash, the board curled up. Also, the wash obscured a few of my pencil lines. Lesson 1: use thicker board. Press harder on transfer.

I mixed up the mid-range skin tones and painted those in. I wasn't careful enough and later found a few spots that were missing paint. Luckily the toning wash showed through (instead of white board). Lesson 2: Mix up more paint than you need, and keep the leftover dried-up mess handy until the very end. Also, keep each mixed color in its own well.

Once I was done, I was planning on blending some of the color "tiles" by softening the edges. I have found a tiny amount of info on the Internets about the gouache "tiling" technique, and thought I'd try it. Instead of nicely blending two adjoining tiles together, all I did was lift up the paint and make a mess. Luckily I learned Lesson #2 early, and had some paint to cover my ass. I still have no idea how tiling works. Lesson 3: Practice techniques before using them for something important. It's hard to cover mistakes in gouache.

I took photos of each step along the way. I'll post those next time... after the holidays. Merry Holidaytime, everyone!

Sunday, December 17, 2006

Shiner 97 Bohemian Black Lager and Gouache Underpainting, Part 2

Most of the beers I've posted have been good. Time for a disappointment. Although it is not a stout or porter, we picked up Shiner 97 Bohemian Black Lager because of the word "black." Some very good dark beers are labeled simply as "black," not stout or porter. But this beer really is a lager, and has almost no dark beer qualities. It tastes just like a light beer, but with heavy undertones. Conclusion: although it might be a good lager (I don't really know), we won't be buying it again.

M: 4
N: 4

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Gouache Underpainting, the Final Chapter

I admit to being a complete newbie when it comes to 1) painting 2) color and 3) portraits. So I really didn't know what I was doing. I chose some colors that I thought would make a good skin tone, and mixed them willy-nilly. I ended up with a color that would look good on a tropical parakeet... but I wasn't going to throw out all that paint. So forgive the ultra-tanned sheen that makes Grandpa look like he's a snorkel instructor in Tuvalu.

I attempted to paint over Left Grandpa. I mixed four values with this shade, but added some blue into the darks for a more interesting contrast. I mixed a few shades of suit and hair color as well. And I painted over.
I forgot to paint the glasses. Anyway, You can see that on the face, the underpainting didn't show through at all. I used opaque mixes for the face, and although the underpainting was a good guide, it didn't do much else. It was great to paint on something other than white, though. On the suit, I used a much more transparent mix, and the underpainting showed through.
Here are some of the techniques I used. You can see the results - not too great. Dry brush looks terrible. Add water and it gives nice texture. Scrubbing an area lifts like nobody's business.

So I learned how to make it work, but didn't much like the results. Lesson: if you make the second layer transparent enough for the underpainting to show through, it tends to lift. Therefore, my actual painting of grandpa will use a watery wash as the underpainting, so I am not painting on white. From this experiment, mostly I learned what not to do.

Wednesday, December 06, 2006

Terrapin Coffee Oatmeal Imperial Stout and Gouache Underpainting

Is it just me, or are these beer names getting longer?

The Terrapin Beer Company is local to Athens, GA, and regularly sends its "limited edition" brews to the local stores. After we first tried Terrapin Coffee Oatmeal Imperial Stout, we fell in love with it, and were devastated when the stores discontinued it. Well, last week, it was there again! Woo!

This beer was the First Place winner at the Atlanta Cask Ale Tasting in 2005 and People's Choice winner in 2006, and for good reason. It's one of the very best beers we've tried. It's expensive, but delicious. You only get 4 for 8 bucks, but it's worth it. It tastes like a chocolatey coffee and a home-baked oatmeal cookie put together. It has no bitterness and no bad aftertaste. It's brewed with coffee. Mmmm. Therapeutic.

M: 10
N: 9.5

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Gouache Underpainting - Part 1

This was an experiment in underpainting, to learn the dos and don'ts. As such, it doesn't look very pretty. But I learned from it, and I hope you do too. Also, it's too long to post all at once.

My excellent Grandpa passed away when I was in college. He was a great man whose personality and good deeds I didn't fully learn about until people spoke at his funeral. Grandma still misses him a great deal, so I'm paiting a portrait of him for her. Do not tell Grandma or it'll ruin her birthday surprise. Thank you.
I traced Grandpa's bust onto cheap illo board with a light "table" I rigged with a desk lamp, textbooks, and a piece of glass. The outlines were very rough and simply showed the major value areas. Then I painted the values with one hue. For Left Grandpa, I mixed grey-blue and cool green. For Right Grandpa, cool red and warm green. I added white in various amounts to get a total of four values. Neither of these are a very good likeness, but that's fine, since this is a value experiment.
I liked how the values turned out. They showed the form well. Using monochrome values was very useful to me because it's what I'm used to with pencils. Even if I don't use an underpainting in the final portrait, I will use these value studies to help. They were great learning experiences in themselves.

The conclusions: next week!

Sunday, December 03, 2006

Red Brick Winter Brew Double Chocolate Oatmeal Porter and the Wacom

This week: the beer with the longest name ever. Or at least that we've bought.

Red Brick Winter Brew Double Chocolate Oatmeal Porter is the latest seasonal product available at our local Beverage Resort. We weren't terribly impressed. Maybe the name is long to distract the buyer from the beer's mediocrity.

Anyhow, the beer isn't very chocolatey or oatmealy. "Double chocolate" my rollerblading-damaged butt. What's that supposed to mean, anyway? It's got an unpleasant tang that smooth beers don't have, and the aftertaste is bright. Dark beers can have an aftertaste problem that I haven't really encountered with light beers... but the good dark ones avoid it. This one didn't.

M: 6
N (introduced half ratings this week): 6.5

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My new Wacom arrived this week. I am ecstatic.

But first... I have Updated the Website. I have new art, and the cool CrashOctopus hats are on sale. Need a hip holiday present? Visit meglyman.com.

Now that the plugging is over, down to business. The tablet was fairly easy to install. I'm convinced that Linux programmers make things easy for uber-nerds, but for average nerds like me it's always a bit frustrating to do things. Maybe they're ensuring that no non-nerds use it... anyway, I only had an hour of frustration before I got the thing working right; no hair-pulling. And it works beautifully!

I started my first piece of digital art. I was able to sketch, "ink," and start to color it with no problems. It took me forever and a day to get this far:


But I intend to practice to get faster. It will go like this:

N: Shouldn't you be doing X? (X = washing dishes, exercising, sleeping)
M: No... I must practice on my tablet. Practice makes perfect, right?

So, eventually I will finish it and post in on my website. And next week, I will write about underpainting in gouache. Because if I write it down today, I must put aside my new toy and do it, which will force me to finish the underpainting experiment I *need* to do now so that I can get Grandma's painting done in time to frame it and give it to her on Christmas. The end.